3 de enero de 2012

Neuropsychiatric consequences of cardiovascular medications


FUENTE ORIGINAL: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3181843/?tool=pmcentrez

Dialogues Clin Neurosci. 2007 March; 9(1): 29–45.

PMCID: PMC3181843 Copyright : © 2007 LLS

Neuropsychiatric consequences of cardiovascular medications

Conséquences neuropsychiatriques des traitements cardiovasculaires

Jeff C. Huffman, MD*

Jeff C. Huffman, Department of Psychiatry, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Mass, USA; Harvard Medical School, Boston, Mass, USA ;

Theodore A. Stern, MD



Theodore A. Stern, Department of Psychiatry, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Mass, USA; Harvard Medical School, Boston, Mass, USA ;

* E-mail: jhuffman@partners.org

This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

The use of cardiovascular medications can have a variety of neuropsychiatric consequences. Many cardiovascular agents cause higher rates of fatigue and sedation than placebo, and case reports of medication-induced mood syndromes, psychosis, and cognitive disturbances exist for many cardiovascular drugs. Depression has been associated with β-blockers, methyldopa, and reserpine, but more recent syntheses of the data have suggested that these associations are much weaker than originally believed. Though low cholesterol levels have been associated with depression and suicide, lipid-lowering agents have not been associated with these adverse effects. Finally, cardiovascular medications may have beneficial neuropsychiatric consequences; for example, the use of clonidine in patients with attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder, the use of prazosin for patients with post-traumatic stress disorder, and the use of propranolol for performance anxiety and akathisia.



Keywords: cardiovascular agent, adverse effect, neurologic manifestation, mood disorder, psychotic disorder, delirium, fatigue